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FLU

Flu

Frequently asked questions

Influenza is a viral infection, caused by influenza virus types A, B or C. The virus is transmitted by virus-containing aerosols produced by coughing, sneezing, or direct contact with respiratory secretions.

Influenza is a viral infection, caused by influenza virus types A, B or C. The virus is transmitted by virus-containing aerosols produced by coughing, sneezing, or direct contact with respiratory secretions.

Persons with influenza may experience fever, cough, sore throat, fatigue, muscle aches, headaches, runny nose, sneezing and chills. Children may also experience vomiting and diarrhoea.

People of all ages are susceptible to the flu, even those who are young and healthy. It is spread easily and can sweep through schools, nursing homes, businesses or towns.

Infected persons may become unwell for up to a week. Most patients take up to 2 weeks to recover from influenza, however it can cause complications or even death. Some of the complications can include pneumonia, bronchitis, croup and ear infections.

The period between infection and onset of symptoms (incubation period) for influenza is 1-3 days. A person with influenza may be contagious 24 hours before symptoms begin and continue to be infectious for a week after the onset of symptoms.

Common side effects include soreness, redness, pain and swelling at the injection site, drowsiness, tiredness, muscle aches and fever. These side effects are usually mild and go away within a few days, usually without any treatment. You should contact your healthcare professional if you are concerned about any symptoms you experience, or if you have a persistent high temperature. If you have any allergies or are concerned about the potential side effects of the flu vaccine please discuss this with your healthcare professional.

Influenza vaccines will not give you the flu as the vaccines available in Australia do not contain ‘live’ virus. After vaccination, the person will develop antibody levels that can help to protect them against the influenza strains circluating that flu season.

Vaccination is best undertaken in autumn (March–May) in anticipation of Australia’s peak flu season which is usually between June and September.

No. Protection is usually achieved within 10 to 14 days of vaccination.

Children can be vaccinated against the flu from the age of 6 months. A vaccine has been developed for the 2016 flu season that is specifically tailored to children under 3 years of age.3 Please contact your healthcare professional for further information.

3. FluQuadri/FluQuadri Junior PI pg 1 ref A

There are two main reasons for getting a yearly flu vaccine:

  • Flu viruses are frequently changing and vaccines may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the most recent and common circulating strains
  • A person’s immune protection from influenza vaccination declines over time and annual vaccination is recommended.

FLU INFO FOR YOUR STATE 5

WHOOPING COUGH INFO FOR YOUR STATE


FLU CASES
2016 TO DATE

FLU CASES 2016 TO DATE 67,002

67,002

WA NT SA VIC TAS ACT QLD NSW WA NT SA VIC TAS ACT QLD NSW

2015 VS 2016 MONTHLY NOTIFIED CASES BY STATE: MAY

Select a month

2015 2016
TAS 31 19
NT 11 19
NSW 417 612
VIC 449 241
WA 318 243
ACT 31 19
QLD 736 661
SA 496 111

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to Tasmania.

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to the Northern Territory.

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to New South Wales. 

 

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to Victoria.

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to Western Australia. 

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to The Australian Capital Territory. 

 

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to Queensland. 

Annual influenza vaccination is provided free through the National Immunisation Program (NIP) to groups who are at an increased risk of influenza complications.

This includes:

- People aged 65 years and over
- Pregnant women
- Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over
- Anyone aged 6 months and over who has a chronic condition placing them at increased risk of complications from influenza

Click here for more information on flu vaccination through the NIP. Additionally click here for flu information specific to South Australia. 

Getting prepared

It is estimated that influenza is responsible for 13,500 hospitalisations and >3,000 deaths in Australia each year

Vaccinate in Autumn to prepare for flu season

Proportion of 2015 respiratory viral tests positive for influenza in Australia

References:

  1. Australian Government Department of Health. The Australian Immunisation Handbook 10th Ed (June 2015 update): Influenza. Available from: http://www.immunise.health.gov.au/internet/immunise/publishing.nsf/Content/Handbook10-home. [Accessed 9th December 2015]
  2. National Centre for Immunisation Research & Surveillance. Factsheet; Influenza. July 2015. Available from http:ncirs.edu.au/assets/provider_resources/fact-sheets/influenza-fact-sheet.pdf. [Accessed April 2016]
  3. WHO INFLUENZA FACT SHEET March 2014. Available from http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs211/en. [Accessed April 2016]
  4. Australian Government Department of Health Therapeutic Goods Administration. AIVC recommendations for the composition of influenza vaccine for Australia in 2016. Available from https://www.tga.gov.au/aivc-recommendations-composition-influenza-vaccine-australia-2016. [Accessed April 2016]
  5. Australian Government Department of Health. Number of notifications of influenza (laboratory confirmed), Australia, in the period of 1991 to 2015 and year-to-date notifications for 2016. Available from http://www9.health.gov.au/cda/source/rpt_3.cfm. [Accessed April 2016]

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